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Growing along with your child

This animation provides information on how children develop and is a helpful reference tool for parents as they accompany their child throughout their growth.

By clicking on the age groups found at the top of the screen, you will discover some of the activities that children are normally able to accomplish.

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Consult only the text:

For each age group, the activities are classified according to different categories:

  • Personal autonomy
  • Communication and interpersonal relationships
  • Education
  • Socioresidential autonomy
  • Leisure and integration into the community
  • Professional and sociooccupational integration.

These categories are daily living activities, that is to say - a series of actions that children accomplish throughout their development. 

  • Personal Autonomy: eating, preparing meals, personal care and hygiene, getting dressed, resting.
  • Socioresidential Autonomy: short distance travel, putting away toys, tidying up their room and doing household chores, personal responsibilities (ex.: handling money).
  • Communication and Interpersonal Relationships: oral communication and body language, written communication, telecommunication, friendships, family, social and sentimental relationships.
  • Leisure and Integration into the Community: long distance travel, transportation, sports, recreational and social activities, civic duties (ex.: honouring commitments, respecting rules and the property of others…).
  • Education: participation in daycare activities, learning in school, homework and lessons, school group activities.
  • Professional and Sociooccupational Integration: first employment, career counseling and choosing a career. 

6-12 Months

Personal Autonomy

  • Hold their bottle with both hands
  • Eat small pieces with their fingers
  • Hold a spoon
  • Put their hands in their mouth

Socioresidential Autonomy

  • Crawl
  • Go up and down stairs on hand and foot
  • Sit up
  • Move around by hanging on to furniture
  • Take few steps if they are held by one or both hands
  • Walk toward their parents

Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

  • Start to speak words “mama” or “dada”
  • Turn around when their name is called
  • React to the word “no”
  • Understand some words
  • Recognize facial expressions
  • Put their arms out when they want to be held
  • Are frightened of strangers

Leisure and Integration into the Community

  • Try to reach for objects
  • Can hold their gaze on a moving object
  • Clap their hands to say “bravo”
  • Can Hold small objects between their thumb and index finger
  • Like to play peek-a-boo 

1-2 Years

Personal Autonomy

  • Participate in getting dressed (extend their arms and legs)
  • Remove certain clothes (ex.: hat)
  • Eat with a spoon
  • Drink from a glass with supervision
  • Start to eat with a fork
  • Drink from a straw
  • Start to learn about cleanliness

Socioresidential Autonomy

  • Go up and down stairs with support and without alternating legs
  • Climb
  • Start to run
  • Squat to pick up an object from the floor

Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

  • Imitate sounds (ex.: animals)
  • Speak their first words
  • Start to form two-word sentences
  • Understand short sentences (ex.: “come to eat”)
  • Follow simple stories
  • Point to parts of their body
  • Can go get an object that was requested of them
  • Sometimes oppose to what parents request
  • Can be aggressive with other children

Leisure and Integration into the Community

  • Scribble
  • Like to look at pictures and turn pages of a book
  • Fit simple geometrical shapes in a mold
  • Take hold of a crayon in a rough manner
  • Can build a simple tower with blocks
  • Start to throw a ball
  • Dance to the rhythm of music

Education

  • Can engage in group activities 

3-4 Years

Personal Autonomy

  • Use a fork properly when eating
  • Start to get dressed on their own
  • Need help to button up their clothes
  • Can use the toilet on their own with little supervision
  • Participate in their own hygiene (ex.: washing hands and body, brushing teeth)

Socioresidential Autonomy

  • Go up and down stairs by alternating legs
  • Take initiative
  • Run, climb and slide
  • Start to put their toys away

Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

  • Start to ask questions
  • Form full sentences
  • Know songs and nursery rhymes
  • Understand the terms “today”, “yesterday” and “tomorrow”
  • Count to 10
  • Have difficulties waiting their turn
  • Can invent an imaginary friend
  • Can be frightened of certain situations (ex.: doctor, dentist)
  • Can express pride, shyness and shame
  • Like to be in the company of their little friends

Leisure and Integration into the Community

  • Play sports and participate in leisure activities with their parents
  • Use rides at the park (under parental supervision)
  • Ride and peddle a tricycle
  • Throw and catch a ball with a better grip
  • Kick a ball
  • Hold a pair of scissors and cut paper
  • Successfully put together a puzzle of 6 to 10 pieces
  • Start to draw little men
  • Start to play make-believe

Education

  • Can go to preschool if the family wishes 

5-7 Years

Personal Autonomy

  • Butter their bread and chop semi-soft foods
  • Get dressed on their own
  • Tie knots
  • Brush their hair
  • Wipe themselves after a bowel movement without any help

Socioresidential Autonomy

  • Answer the phone
  • Tidy up their room and put clothes away
  • Start to manage money

Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

  • Invent and tell stories
  • Understand complex sentences
  • Read a simple story without the help of pictures
  • Start to learn how to write
  • Make friends with other children

Leisure and Integration into the Community

  • Play sports and engage in other activities without their parents
  • Draw little men with details such as clothing and fingers
  • Successfully put together a puzzle of 15 to 20 pieces
  • Are conscious of rules at home and in the community

Education

  • Go to elementary school
  • Do their homework and lessons under close parental supervision 

8-9 Years

Personal Autonomy

  • Prepare a simple meal (ex.: breakfast, lunch)
  • Take care of their hygiene on their own

Socioresidential Autonomy

  • Can walk to school
  • Set and clear the table
  • Can help do the dishes

Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

  • Tell stories and recount events
  • Participate in conversations
  • Write short texts
  • Use a public phone
  • Use a computer and popular software without any help
  • Express their attachment to their family
  • Prefer friends of their own sex

Leisure and Integration into the Community

  • Ride a bicycle
  • Play team sports or engage in artistic activities without their parents
  • Play board games and follow the rules
  • Chat over the Internet

Education

  • Go to elementary school
  • Collaborate in group projects
  • Do their homework under parental supervision

Professional and Sociooccupational Integration

  • Do chores to earn an allowance 

10-12 Years

Personal Autonomy

  • Use certain kitchen aids under supervision (ex.: stove)
  • Choose clothes according to weather conditions and events

Socioresidential Autonomy

  • Can take care of their personal belongings and materials made available to them
  • Participate in household chores

Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

  • Can read short novels
  • Write texts of one page
  • Can surf the web
  • Express their opinions and oppose those of their parents

Leisure and Integration into the Community

  • Like to engage in activities with their friends
  • Use public transportation in company of their friends
  • Choose recreational, sports and social activities under parental supervision

Education

  • Choose and register to a high school with the help of their parents
  • Do their homework with little parental supervision

Professional and Sociooccupational Integration

  • Find ways to earn pocket money 

13-15 Years

Personal Autonomy

  • Take their medication
  • Take care of menstrual hygiene
  • Shave on their own
  • Put on deodorant
  • Do their laundry using the washer and dryer

Socioresidential Autonomy

  • Participate in the upkeep of the home
  • Make deposits and withdrawals at the bank
  • Honour commitments
  • Can stay home alone during the day for a given period

Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

  • Phone to request information
  • Write, stamp and mail a letter
  • Download and listen to music
  • Develop sentimental relationships with young people of their age

Leisure and Integration into the Community

  • Use local public transportation to go somewhere familiar
  • Coordinate the use of their free time (ex.: leisure, work)
  • Plan and participate in mixed group activities
  • Ride a scooter

Education

  • Go to high school
  • Manage their homework and lessons
  • Go on school trips

Professional and Sociooccupational Relationships

  • Seek and earn work experience or do volunteer work 

16-17 Years

Personal Autonomy

  • Prepare and plan complex meals on their own (ex.: follow a recipe)
  • Wake up and go to bed on their own

Socioresidential Autonomy

  • Manage their pocket money
  • Use a bank machine
  • Plan a budget
  • Do their own personal shopping

Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

  • Read newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • Make appointments
  • Maintain sentimental relationships with young people their own age
  • Use contraception

Leisure and Integration into the Community

  • Practice sports, recreational and social activities without their parents
  • Use local public transportation to go somewhere new
  • Use long distance transportation (ex.: bus, train)
  • Drive a car
  • Respect public and social norms

Education

  • Register to a cegep or special trade school

Professional and Sociooccupational Integration

  • Get a job
  • Think about goals for the future, a type of career 

About this page
Updated on 3/24/2015
Created on 3/23/2015
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